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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Dec 16, 2006 6:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Top ten Live shows attended Non-Dead/Top ten live Albums of all time

Jealous does not even begin to describe how I feel about you seeing Hendrix live in '69 (or at any time) and The Allmans at the Fillmore in 1970.

Good heavens, man--do you realize that's the musical equivalent of walking on the moon??????

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Poster: mcglone Date: Dec 16, 2006 7:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Top ten Live shows attended Non-Dead/Top ten live Albums of all time

OD,

im with grendel - wow!

i would love to read your review of that first 'real' concert.

This post was modified by mcglone on 2006-12-17 03:28:04

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Poster: orchiddoctor Date: Dec 16, 2006 9:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Top ten Live shows attended Non-Dead/Top ten live Albums of all time

Make you feel worse:

That was my first concert--that is, full length live performance. I also saw--in 1966--at the Brooklyn Fox theater, a line up featuring the Who, Cream, the Yardbirds, and a host of other groups of the time. I really don't remember this one. It was a "revue" type show where 6 or 7 groups came on and played maybe four tunes including their hits.


As to first actual musical event, and this is a memory stretch: I had an older cousin, Karen (I think around ten years older than I was), who was a folkie from waaaay back. She used to take me to a far off land call Greenwhich Village where all these very strange musicians hung out on 4th street. I was too young to understand what was going on in the coffee shops (I was maybe 12-13), but I do know that she was hyped up on a guy named Jessie Collin Young, another named Paul Simon, and this scraggly guy with a weird voice named Bob Dylan. These were afternoon Hootenanny type events. I remember all the bohemian types (before hippies) sipping coffee and nodding along to the music. Each performer might play 4-5 songs and then yield the small stage to the next guy (or woman).


I went to Woodstock with Karen's older. brother Neal and his then wife. Neal was a hoot. I'd go to his apartment in Queens on a Saturday night. The ritual never deviated. He would get out his baggie of weed. strain enough for two joints, use a rolling machine, and then put on the first Santana l.p. We'd fire up j #1 and listen to both sides. Then came the high point. For j #2, he'd put on LIVE/DEAD, getting up to switch from sides 1 and 2 to side 3 (only).

So, the three of us headed up to Yasgur's farm on Saturday. The traffic was beyond insane. We pulled off the road and parked about three miles from the event. As we walked along the road, we saw dozens of mudsoaked, unhappy looking people leaving the event. "You can't hear the music. You can't see the stage. No food or water." We turned around and went home. Bad choice? I think not. If you weren't in the middle of the sea of faces, then you weren't going to catch any music. It was hot, muggy, and miserable. Note that when Hendrix finally played, most of the crowd had left!!!

We caught the movie and read the book instead.